How do fires affect hummingbirds?

Jul 2011 - Biodiversity - Birds - Conservation - Fire

Professor Sarahy Contreras has been studying hummingbirds in western Mexico for nearly 20 years. Her current project tackles the question of how different frequencies and intensities of post-fires affect hummingbird populations in the Sierra de Manantlan Biosphere Reserve.

How to protect, live and let live in precious areas such as biosphere reserves?

Sep 2010 - Biodiversity - Conservation - Remote Sensing

Oscar Cardenas, an invited scientist in the SILVIS Lab, is working on the zoning of a biosphere reserve in Mexico where he studying jaguar habitat in order to assure the species presence for the future. While doing so, he’s faced with social issues that are intrinsically and deeply related with natural resources protection and preservation and raise some new research questions.

Birds and Extreme Weather

Aug 2010 - Biodiversity - Birds

Climate change leads to increases in extreme weather. Tom Albright and co-authors investigate the effect of heatwaves and drought on bird abundance and diversity in the conterminous United States.

Siberian Cranes and China's Poyang Lake

Aug 2010 - Biodiversity - Birds - Conservation

Poyang Lake, one of China’s most diverse wildlife areas, increasingly faces shifting use patterns and new threats to the wildlife and human communities who call it home. Ph.D. candidate James Burnham seeks to understand how changing lake hydro-dynamics and human impacts affect the local wildlife, particularly the critically endangered Siberian Crane.

Animal Movement and Vehicle Collisions

Aug 2010 - Biodiversity

In Sweden, moose are a national symbol, a major game species – and a hazard for car travel, with some 4,500 accidents per year. SILVIS researcher Wiebke Neumann is studying the patterns of moose movement and accident rates in order to improve safety to both moose and people.

Wood Warblers and Oak Decline

Jan 2010 - Biodiversity - Birds - Conservation

The woodlands of the upper Midwest are undergoing a major transformation as oak forests and savannas are being replaced by maples. How will this transformation affect Wisconsin wildlife, such as our colorful migrant wood warblers? A field team led by SILVIS researcher and graduate student Eric Wood is trying to find out.